How to use Mustache with JS / jQuery – a working example

I’ve been evaluating Mustache as a Javascript templating engine because my manager didn’t like the look of my jQuery code with lots of concatenation of HTML with javascript variables. The Mustache documentation doesn’t give working Javascript / jQuery examples so once I got this working it seemed only right to share it with you all (and hopefully drive a bit more traffic to my blog).
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CKEditor Tutorial: Adding a ‘Link to local page from site’ field

UPDATE 4TH March ’14
The method described in this article is over 3 years old and doesn’t work properly with recent versions of CKEditor but Simon Georget has improved this implementation for CKEditor 4.2.2 and you can find it on Github here.

CKeditor is a great piece of work, not least because it’s free to use by anyone who wants to integrate it into their project. Myself, I am using it for a web content management system that I am developing and it’s definitely the best javascript WYSIWYG editor I’ve yet to come across, especially since it provides a comprehensive and well documented API framework.
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Install CFMX7.0.2 / Apache2.2 / Centos5.2 / Virtual PC 2007

I’ve just spent the last two days preparing a new development environment on a Virtual PC 2007 VM for the application I’m currently building.
The idea behind this setup is that it mirrors as closely as possible the production environment which is CFMX7.0.2 / Centos 5.2 / Apache 2.2.

It took a lot of abortive attempts to get this right but I finally managed it with the help of the very well written walkthrough by Bill Mitchell which itself refers greatly to another blog post by Steve Erat. Mr Mitchell’s guide is great – it covers several different methods of installing the Apache connector in CFMX7 – he can take all of the credit for this, in fact I copied large sections of his procedure (thanks Mr Mitchell :)).

So I’m going to now give a set of precise instructions on how to set up and configure this dev environment that should work first time. I’m also going to be a bit naughty and provide the wsconfig file for download off my server – this will save some more time.

  1. Begin by installing Centos 5.2 on a virtual machine running in Virtual PC – make sure to use “text mode” for the installation as VPC doesn’t support 24bit graphics and will not display the installer properly.
  2. Once installed, open the ports you need in the Centos firewall
  3. Install LAMP (Apache, PHP & MySQL) using Yum (see this article for details).
  4. Reboot the server and check that everything works properly so far. Once you’re sure it is then it is a good time to enable undo disks in VPC as the next phase of the install can go wrong and if it does you can just revert back to this safe position and try again. To enable undo disks:
    1. shut down the virtual machine
    2. in the VPC console open the VM’s settings
    3. select undo disks (6th item) and enable it
    4. restart the VM
  5. Download the coldfusion-702-lin.bin installer from the Adobe download site – on the main Coldfusion download page you will need to click the "related downloads" link to find the correct download
  6. Disable Selinux (find out how here)
  7. Install libXp
    yum install libXp
  8. Add a coldfusion runtime user
    adduser username
  9. Rename the binary installer
    [root@machine]# cp coldfusion-702-lin.bin coldfusion-702-lin.bin.backup 
  10. Use the following string replace command on the binary to comment out a line that causes problems
    [root@machine]# cat coldfusion-702-lin.bin.backup | sed "s/export LD_ASSUME/#xport LD_ASSUME/" > coldfusion-702-linux.bin 
  11. Make the modified binary executable
    [root@machine]# chmod 755 coldfusion-702-lin.bin 
  12. Execute the installer and select the “Built-In Webserver” option (don’t worry this will be replace with Apache later) IMPORTANT – DON’T LAUNCH THE COLDFUISON SERVER YET – if you do then you’ll have to start all over again.
  13. Open the /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/servers/coldfusion/SERVER-INF/jrun.xml file and
    1. Find the entry labeled ProxyService
    2. Add <attribute name=”deactivated”>false</attribute> (changed from true)
    3. Find the entry labeled WebService
    4. Add <attribute name="deactivated">true</attribute> (changed from false)
    5. Find the entry cacheRealPath
    6. Add <attribute name="cacheRealPath">true</attribute> (changed from false)
    7. Save the file
  14. In /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/ create a directory called ‘wsconfig’
  15. In /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig create a driectory called ’1′ (one)
  16. In /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig create a file called wsconfig.properties and populate it with:
    #JRun Web Server Configuration File
    # edited by bill 10.31 Thur May 24
    1=Apache,/etc/httpd/conf,"","",""
    1 .srv=localhost,"coldfusion"
    

    and save the file

  17. In /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig/1 create a file called jrunserver.store and populate it with:
    proxyservers=127.0.0.1:51011 The 51011 is for ColdFusion MX 7:
  18. Download this file and place it into the /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig/1 directory
  19. Change ownership of the wsconfig directory and its contents to the coldfusion user:
    chown -R <coldfusion user> /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig

    for example, I created a user named ‘coldfusion’ so I entered:

    chown -R coldfusion /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig

    (when you manually create this folder / file structure everything will be owned by the root user. This will cause problems when Apache attempts to connect to coldfusion – hence the above step)

  20. Edit the httpd config file:
    vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

    and find the line containing DirectoryIndex. Add index.cfm to the list of default file names so it should now look something like this:

    DirectoryIndex index.html index.html.var index.cfm

    and then append the following section to the end of the file and re-save it:

    # JRun Settings
    LoadModule jrun_module /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig/1/mod_jrun22.so
    
    JRunConfig Verbose false
    JRunConfig Apialloc false
    JRunConfig Ssl false
    JRunConfig Ignoresuffixmap false
    JRunConfig Serverstore /opt/coldfusionmx7/runtime/lib/wsconfig/1/jrunserver.store
    JRunConfig Bootstrap 127.0.0.1:51011
    #JRunConfig Errorurl 
    AddHandler jrun-handler .cfm .cfml .cfc .jsp .jws .cfr .cfswf
    
    
  21. Create a symlink to the CFIDE folder in the document root:
    cd /var/www/html
    ln -s /opt/coldfusionmx7/wwwroot/CFIDE
  22. Restart the apache server
    [root@machine ~]# service httpd restart 
  23. Start the Coldfusion server
    [root@machine ~]# service coldfusionmx7 start 
  24. Test everything works properly by putting an index.cfm containing some CFML scripting (eg <cfdump var=”#CGI#”>) into the apache web root and type:
     http://centos-VM/index.cfm

    You should see the CGI dump. Then test the coldfusion administrator works

    http://centos-VM/CFIDE/administrator

    where centos-VM is either a domain that you’ve set up for your new VM or its IP address on your LAN

  25. Now you should have a fully working virtual Centos server with CFML (& PHP) support. Don’t forget to install the MySQL connector J Driver too – I already blogged that one here

    Finally you really should should close the VM saving the changes. Before re-launching the VM I would recommend that you copy the VM folder to an archive location – you never know when you might need a freshly installed VM with this environment in the future. Leaving undo disks enabled in Virtual PC is a good idea if you can afford the extra disk space required – if you do break your dev environment in the future and can’t fix it but don’t want to restore the initial image then leaving undo disks enabled will allow you to roll back to the last time you saved your changes. Just remember to save your changes regularly.

    Good luck with it!

The best way to work with CFINPUT type=”checkbox” with MySQL

checkbox-1Since I began using CFML I’ve struggled with this problem every time I want to add a checkbox to a form that updates a database field.

The problem is that if the checkbox isn’t checked then no evidence of its existence is passed to the form’s action page. This causes a problem when updating a database field because you can’t rely on the FORM structure to provide a value of “no” or “off” that can be updated in your db field.
You therefore need to use something like this before your <cfupdate..>, <cfinsert…> or <cfquery…> tags.:

 <cfparam name="FORM.mycheckbox" default="off">

Similarly when populating a form containing a checkbox you need to use a plain <input type=”checkbox”> HTML tag instead of the CFINPUT version. This then allows you to insert <cfif> tag like so…

<input type="checkbox" name="myCheckbox" 
	<cfif #dbQuery.myCheckbox# eq 'on'> 
		checked="yes" 
	</cfif> 
>

The db field must then be either a string-based data type or an enum type with ‘on’ and ‘off’ as its possible values.

Save Energy! – Power Up Your Home Linux Box From Behind Your Work Proxy Using Wake On LAN (WOL)

pwrbutton1These days with the price of electricity being so high and with computer power supplies being so big, not to mention the global warming / climate change factor, leaving your home-server running all day while you’re out at work on the off-chance that you might need to access it during the day is a luxury most people can ill-afford.

In an ideal world you would be able to switch on your home server remotely from your work laptop when you’re away from home. Maybe you need to log in via SSH or FTP (if these ports are not blocked by the proxy) or maybe you have it set up as a web server for development use (as I do) and would like to use some of your office downtime to work on something on your dev server. Once you’re done you can then switch it off again with a shell command.

All of this is easy enough to do so long as your home server’s connection to the internet is via an ethernet card that supports Wake On LAN (WOL). You can send a “magic packet“, a string of characters specifically formed to wake your server up either directly from your windows laptop or, if you are behind your company’s proxy server that blocks traffic on port 9, from any internet webserver.

Pre-requisites

This article will describe the steps that you need to take in order to configure this energy-saving functionality. I am assuming the following:

  1. your home server is running Ubuntu/Debian Linux (although it should be possible to use any flavour of Unix/Linux).
  2. the server is connected to the internet with a cable via an ethernet card that supports WOL
  3. your server has a static IP address at least within your home network. (If your ISP changes your IP address periodically like mine does then you will probably need to either pay them extra for a fixed IP address or use a dynamic DNS service)
  4. you have FTP write access to a webserver connected to the internet that supports PHP scripting
  5. you have about an hour of spare time.

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